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ようおいでたなもし!

Yō oideta namoshi! Welcome to Ehime!
Everyone here at Ehime AJET hopes to provide you with helpful and useful information to aid in your transition in our beautiful-citrus filled corner of Japan.
Please check out our different tabs to find out more about life in Ehime.

If you have any questions or suggestions feel free to contact us here at Ehime AJET anytime.

だんだん
– Your AJET team!

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The Murder Mystery Dinner

By Sammi Jarnagin

On March 2nd, Ehime AJET hosted their annual Murder Mystery Dinner.  I’m a first year ALT, so this was the first event of its kind that I could go to.  I’m a sucker for true crime, thrillers, and mysteries so I had always wanted to attend a murder mystery event of some kind and this seemed like the perfect opportunity.  I booked a spot immediately and was happy to see that several of my friends had, too.

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The Tale of the Ten Fish

By Ada Smith

I remember when I first came to Japan and heard stories of wild and crazy things that would happen to JETs; unexpected adventures that would happen or strange gifts that they were given just for the fact that they were one of the sole representatives of a different nation in their town. They were the kinds of stories that were hard to believe because they sounded so extreme, so they must be rare or non-existent.

Oh how young and naive I was.

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Building AJET: The President’s Summary

By Lee Anne Ledwell

My name is Lee Anne Ledwell and, as I’m sure most of you are aware, I was the Ehime AJET President from 2018-2019. Together with the current president, Laura Beardslee, we were able to rejuvenate Ehime AJET into the blossoming organization you know today. I wanted to take the time to write out this article explaining everything that has happened with Ehime AJET from its resurrection to what our council has accomplished this year to where I hope future councils will lead us.

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Climate Change in Ehime

By Tim Van Gardingen

For a cloudy day in January, it is strikingly warm in Matsuyama city. Matsuyama is the largest city on Shikoku, Japan’s smallest main island. Usually the coldest month of the year, Matsuyama is today enjoying a very mild 14 degrees C.

The warmer winter days are only one sign of the increasing grasp of climate change in south Japan. Regional typhoon patterns are also changing, and the combination of rising temperatures and increasing typhoon damage poses new threats to the region.

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A Fun Life, but a Short One: Why One Year is Right for Me

By Cassandra Mainiero

When I submitted my re-contracting response to the Japanese Exchange and Teaching (JET) Progamme, my elementary kocho-sensei asked one question.

“Only one year?” 

“Yeah,” I sighed, feeling disappointed. “It’s a family obligation.”

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Feast Or Famine: Being an ALT in a Senior High School

By Jordan Rocke

For this article, I tried to thing of an interesting perspective I could provide here. In the past, I’ve talked with some first year Primary or Junior High ALTs who didn’t know much about the Senior High School (SHS) system. I figured I might be able to help out by giving everyone an idea about how SHS work, and what teaching at a SHS is like, at least in my experience.

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Why Japan is Scared to Fix Overwork Culture

By Tim van Gardingen

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On an empty train station platform in rural Japan, there is a poster pasted on the wall with a message in imposing red letters: “Stop Karoshi!” Karoshi is a phrase meaning ‘death by overworking’, and the concept has become so normalised that it has entered the Japanese lexicon. The phenomenon, despite efforts to counter it, appears set to stay.

At first glance, the Japanese government appears to be working hard to battle the nation’s unhealthy working hours, but its current approach is at best superficial and at worst a purposeful avoidance of the problem.

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VR Zone Shinjuku: Top 3 Experiences

By Niall Magee

Last December I went to VR Zone Shinjuku, a virtual reality park in Tokyo, for the second time. It opened in July 2017 and will be closing in March of this year, but another location, VR Zone Osaka, opened last year on floors 8 and 9 of the Umeda HEP Five building. These theme parks are a part of “VR ZONE Project i Can” which is an initiative headed by game/toy company Bandai Namco to popularize virtual reality. It all started with a pop-up VR park that ran from April to October 2016 in Tokyo’s Odaiba district, near the famous giant Gundam statue.

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The Nightmare of Names

By Tim van Gardingen

What’s in a name? Or, in the case of Japan, what on earth is the name in the first place? I found out the hard way just how tricky a Japanese name can be.

Names are important. Abraham Lincoln is reported to have never forgotten a person’s name, even of those who he only ever met once. I assume the reporters meant twice, as with those he met only once, there’s no way to tell.  I can tell two things for certain from this: Lincoln understood the power of names, and Lincoln never had to learn the names of Japanese school children.

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