Tag Archives: Haiku

Iyo Kasuri – The Calming Dark Blue of Ehime

立秋の紺落ち付くや伊予絣 Risshuu no kon ochitsuku ya Iyo kasuri At the start of fall, dark blue puts my mind at ease – Iyo kasuri – Natsume Soseki 夏目礎石

The famous author and poet Natsume Soseki dedicated one of his renowned haiku to the calming beauty of dark blue Iyo kasuri, a fabric  export carrying the name of Iyo Province, modern day Ehime Prefecture. But what is Iyo kasuri exactly?

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Threads dyed using the kasuri process

Often translated as “ikat,” kasuri (絣) is a fabric dyeing technique that involves tying cotton around threads before submerging them in a vat of fermenting indigo dye. After being dipped in the vat of dye many times and allowed to oxidize into a dark blue color, the cotton is untied from the threads, leaving behind undyed, white areas. Anyone who has experience with tie-dye would be familiar with this. However, unlike tie-dye, individual threads are dyed instead of an already finished cloth. Patterns are painstakingly calculated and mapped out using bamboo rulers so that when weaved together, the white and blue sections of thread create a repeating pattern. If the dyeing on the thread is off even a little, it can ruin the whole product. The resulting pattern often has a slightly hazy outline, called kasure (掠れ), meaning “blurred” in Japanese, a likely source of the name Iyo kasuri.

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Examples of clothing made with Iyo kasuri patterns

This technique came to Japan from India via the Ryukyu islands and spread throughout the country during the Edo and Meiji Periods. However, the Iyo Province version became one of the most well-known with its smooth finish and more lighthearted designs. Matsuyama native Kagiya Kana (1782-1864), considered the mother of kasuri, thought up many of these fanciful designs such as diamonds, 6-pointed star hemp leaves, hexagons, and more. According to legend, she was inspired after watching farmers change the thatching on their roofs. Over time, the bamboo had weathered and aged, but where they had been tied together, the bamboo was its original color. Besides the fun patterns, a few other elements aided in the quick rise of Iyo kasuri’s popularity. The Iyo Province already had a strong textile trade network established by the production of striped cotton fabric. Also, because the dyeing process strengthens the threads used in the fabric, Iyo kasuri was often used as durable but fashionable working clothes, a market that had been largely untapped. Furthermore, traditional hand looms used in Japan were inefficient, taking a lot of time and energy to weave with. However, Shinsuke Kikuya (born in 1773), a merchant with a store in Masakicho who was familiar with textiles, bought a loom from Kyoto and began experimenting with ways to improve it. Eventually, he invented the takabata (高機), an upright, treadle-operated loom which would allow weavers to create fabric much faster and more easily than ever before. Iyo kasuri is alive and well even today. The iconic navy blue and white patterns can be found in everything from kimono to Western-style clothes, hats, coin purses, folding fans, and more. Some dyers have even been inspired by tie-dye and have created a hybrid using Iyo kasuri dying techniques on finished cloth to formtie-dye-like patterns. Other colors outside of dark blue have also been introduced through artificial dyes, expanding Iyo kasuri’s possibilities. One place where Iyo kasuri is alive and well is Mingeiiyokasurikaikan (民芸伊予かすり会館) or the Iyo Kasuri Folk Arts Museum. Located near the Kinuyama Iyotetsu station in Matsuyama, the Iyo Kasuri Folk Arts Museum offers visitors many different experiences for only 100 yen. (You can download their app at the front desk for an English guide to the museum.)

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Iyo Kasuri Folk Arts Museum 民芸伊予かすり会館 in Matsuyama, Ehime

The first part of the museum shows the many steps taken in making Iyo kasuri. Set up like a mix between an old Japanese home (where dying originated) and a modern textile factory, visitors can walk through while seeing examples of thread preparation and design creation, tempering the thread by boiling it, the measuring and tying of the threads, dying, untying, winding the warp threads, weaving, and examples of the final products. There are also historic photos of some of the original dyers and weavers running along the wall along with quilts and clothing made of Iyo kasuri.

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A modern loom with warp threads of various colors

The next section goes over the history of Iyo kasuri, also including many examples of historical pieces including screens, clothes, and decorative panels. The designs range from simple geometric patterns to depictions of nature, such as birds and fish. A few pieces even display religious figures from Japanese mythology . After learning all of this history and walking past the very tempting gift shop, visitors enter a room filled with indigo vats and looms. For around 2000 yen, visitors can try their hand at making their own Iyo kasuri tie-dye handkerchief. Visitors can also take a turn weaving at a loom. The dyeing can take close to an hour to do, and it closes before the rest of the museum (around 2:30 pm), so I would recommend going early or calling in advance  if you want to take part in this. Along with an Ehime-themed dining areaand a gift shop that sells an assortment of Iyo kasuri goods and Ehime-themed omiyage, the  museum also houses an exhibit of Ehime folk art. At the end of the route, which loops back to the entrance, is a room filled with handmade paper, pottery, glassware, and much more including, of course, Iyo kasuri.

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Bolts of Iyo kasuri fabric along with goods made from it, in various patterns

A dark blue fabric for both the workers and the nobility, painstakingly made by inventive minds, Iyo kasuri is a treasure from Ehime’s history  that has spread throughout the country of Japan and into the present.  Smooth, durable, and decorated in fun and playful patterns, it is no wonder Iyo’s style of indigo dyed fabric was such an instant hit. It is also no wonder the sight of it in early autumn made Natsume Soseki pause, relax, and find a bit of peace in the fast-paced and quickly modernizing world of Meiji Japan.

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Iyo Kasuri Folk Arts Museum foyer with Mikyan cut-out

I would like to thank 民芸伊予かすり会館 and its workers for providing information that was used in the writing of this article.

Written by Michael Haverty, a first year JET living in Chuyo, Ehime. Michael also took the photographs that accompany his article. 

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In Shiki’s Honor- A Haiku Celebration, by ALT’s

This year is the 150th anniversary of two of Matsuyama’s most celebrated literary icons, Natsume Soseki and Masaoka Shiki. Michael Haverty has created a series of photos inspired by the late writers, depicting their impact on present day Matsuyama.

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Shiki Statue in Dogo

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Masaoka Shiki was an inspirational human being, for those of you who aren’t familiar with his work, a visit to the Shiki museum in Matsuyama is a must.  Shiki achieved many things within his short life,  despite being plagued with tuberculosis for the majority of this. Not only did he help to revive the art form of haiku and tanka, he also acted as a war correspondent during the First-Sino Japanese War and coined most Japanese baseball terminology. In honor of Masaoka Shiki’s 150th anniversary, the Mikan presents to you a haiku extravaganza featuring poetry from ALTs across Ehime prefecture. Some have been inspired by traditional haiku form, whilst others take on a modern approach, whereas some take a comedic turn, akin to senryu.


Summer Storm

Head bowed against rain

Where do you see the beauty?

Petite flower’s smile.

 

Remembering

How’s the weather?

Too hot, too muggy, too much.

I dream of autumn.

Ada Smith


si won

Si Won Yi


Wild wind whispers while

Summer sun sings sapor songs.

Wayward we wander…

くき


Osamurai-san

Long, beautiful nails;

A yukata and geta;

He arpeggiates.

 

Bugged

Cicadas droning,

Dragonflies flit and flutter.

Mosquitoes stab me.

 

ugh

Woke up late today…

Cannot… Stumbling through fog…

Fire me back to bed.

Ciaran Doyle


A tinge of yellow

on every green growing tree

Fall, what a relief.

 

Cicadas are loud

I can hear them in my dreams

There is no escape.

Kate Flake


Poetry

I envy people

Who put words togetherand

get Perfect poetry.

 

Spring

The ground awakens

“Mushi atsui desu ne.”

Bugs and heavy heat.

 

Summer

Like a sweaty hug

From that one estranged Aunty

Can’t escape summer.

 

Why

Turn the lock firmly

Faceplant in front of aircon

Summer is the worst.

 

The Cyclist

The rain god is pissed,

The heavens open heavy

Unplanned morning swim.  

 

The Cyclist Part 2

The sky has opened

Walls of water spray my bike

Where is my raincoat?

 

Autumn

Fall clings to the trees

Fog erases the mountains

Freezing wind bites bones.

 

Local

Float through cityscape

A common yet foreign sight

You, the A.L.T.

 

Students

Surprise in their eyes

As they see you in the street,

I exist here too.

 

Work

Tall dull white building,

Eerie disjointed singing,

Children’s laugher too.

Kai Dearlove


Off from work early

Still wearing my business suit

They think I’m important

 

Rain at the station

“I’ll leave when it gets better”

It only gets worse

 

Imitation sky

Paint chips off rotting concrete

It’s pacing its cage

 

Lost petals lost in

Bike pedals form a surprise

Bouquet in my spoke

 

A twenty-four hour

Vending machine inside a

Twelve hour grocery store

 

Hit a bump too hard

Groceries jump from my basket

Salt peppers the road

 

Normal, strange people

Saying thanks five times over

To an empty room

 

Hilltop children’s park

Brutalist architecture

Lost in knee-high grass

 

“Under Construction”

Laid against a chipped torii

Taut vines wrap around

 

Evening Ropeway Street

Sun dims and lights tick on

Soft jazz pianos

Tim Alley


黒いマント 星明かりのネックレス あたしのハロウィーン

 夏の夕 セミや鈴虫 ラジオいらない

Kelsey Cooknick


遠くても 潮風に向かい 同じかな

Emily Crichton


 

秋風に 吾がカールの髪を なびかせつ

Hayley Cox